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October 23, 2013

3

Scare Canyon, Wild Elk, a Rustic Log Cabin & an Australian Tourist

by Jason Dutton-Smith
Stunning views over the Utah Mountain ranges.

Driving through the wild Wasatch Mountains only an hour and half drive from picturesque Salt Lake City, Utah, we turned off the unpaved road into Scare Canyon. This dusty one car lane meandered through the forest and deep into the thick woods where we were greeted by the charming A-frame log cabin we were to call home for the next three days. It’s rustic out here with no running water, no electricity and just the stars to guide us. I was in love already…

The mountain air is cool, crisp and inviting with every breath possessing a feel of pure oxygen. This is nature at her best and most beautiful. Our daily pilgrimage to the fresh water creek was met with gentle forest landscapes reminiscent of a Monet painting.

While riding a four wheeler along the open forest trails and through the vast open fields towards the creek, we would pass each day a small Beaver dam. Common in the area, these neatly placed piles of sticks create small ponds and are where the beavers live and breed. It also provides protection from their natural predators such as the cougars and coyotes that roam freely. This is one stunning location filled with beautiful flora and fauna.

Welcome to Scare Canyon. Really not that scary after all.

Welcome to Scare Canyon. Really not that scary after all.

Our A-frame cabin in Scare Canyon.

Our A-frame cabin in Scare Canyon.

Our rustic log cabin in the forest.

Our rustic log cabin in the forest.

While enjoying a cup of tea on our first morning with my sister and brother-in-law, I stepped out onto the small rickety front balcony. From this post I was admiring the American flag snapping in the breeze when I heard a soft rustling of the bushes. This could be anything I thought.

My vivid Australian city slicker mind instantly turned to thoughts of a large black bear, stalking my every move with its razor sharp teeth ready to pounce on this naïve boy from Australia standing in the open. But my apprehension was soon turned to delight when through the bushes emerged a large elk followed by a smaller wobbly legged spotted calf.

Elk roaming through the thick forest next to our cabin.

Elk roaming through the thick forest next to our cabin.


You may also like…
Utah Parks – Utah’s 5 National Parks
More National Parks – A guide to America’s National Parks
Grand Canyon – The South Rim of the Grand Canyon

Viator


As the elk and her calf moved from the dense forest into the small clearing in front of the cabin, they stopped to have a look up at me before continuing up the side of the cabin and into the thick wooded forest beyond. I marvelled as I watched these majestic animals slowly meander their way around while foraging for food.

Looking down to Porcupine Reservoir.

Looking down to Porcupine Reservoir.

The stunning Scare Canyon mountain ranges in Utah.

The stunning Scare Canyon mountain ranges in Utah.

I now understand where the saying ‘a deer caught in headlights’ comes from; except in this case I was the deer caught in headlights, an Aussie boy in Utah watching a big, beautiful elk in the wilds of Scare Canyon.

This really is God’s country.

Old lookout of Scare Canyon

Old lookout of Scare Canyon

Four wheel driving through the Utah Mountains.

Four wheel driving through the Utah Mountains.

Wild flowers in abundance throughout Scare Canyon.

Wild flowers in abundance throughout Scare Canyon.

3 Comments Post a comment
  1. slhall
    Sep 22 2016

    Your “Elk” is actually a mule deer.

    Reply

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  1. Utah’s Mighty 5 National Parks | More Than Route 66 | USA Travel Blog | Blog on America

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